Coffee Porter Recipe

Here are some notes and ideas for a porter recipe that includes coffee.

coffee porter recipe

Trying to decide what to brew next is sometimes tricky. There are too many options.

My beer reserves at the moment are heavily loaded towards pale ale. There are bottles of single hop beer as well as a batch of freshly bottled strong bitter (recipe coming soon, just as soon as I’ve got a good photo of it!).

Coming through for bottling is a batch of saison that I brewed to see how much difference spice additions and fermentation temperature make.

So there’s a lot of light coloured beer.

Although I continue to brew single hop pale ales as and when I can, I want to mix in something darker.

It feels like a good chance to try something new, so I’m going to brew a coffee porter.

Coffee Porter

My awareness of this drink comes from this review of Wolaver Alta Gracia Coffee Porter.

I’ve not tried one myself so am shooting in the dark really, but it sounds as though it could be tasty. It’s a brew that’s just for fun and an excuse to try out coffee in beer.

My previous attempt at porter was fairly successful, probably the most popular of my beers with people who aren’t me, so I’ll use that as a base.

It had a great malty flavour which I think will work well with the coffee.

My Porter Recipe

Recipe Volume
15 litres

Malts
68% Pale Ale: 2.6 kg
16% Munich: 0.6kg
10% Crystal 30L: 0.40kg
4% Black Patent: 0.15kg
2% Crystal 60L: 0.08kg
(O.G.: 1.056)

Mash Time
90 mins

Mash Target Temperature
68°C

Hops
Nugget (12%): 9g for 90 mins
Kent Goldings (5.3%): 5g for 20 mins
Kent Goldings (5.3%): 20g for 5 mins
(30 IBUs)

Yeast
Windsor Dry

Wolaver Coffee Porter Clone

Conveniently, in the Wolaver coffee porter review Bryan (the author) included a link to this clone recipe:

(Scaled to same batch size as mine)

Recipe Volume
15 litres

Malts
80% Pale Ale: 5.1 kg
8% Crystal 60L: 0.54kg
5% Chocolate 380L: 0.34kg
4% White Wheat: 0.25kg
2% Black Patent: 0.15kg
(O.G.: 1.068)

More
75g cold steeped coffee added near end of fermentation
1/2 vanilla bean (split, scraped and chopped)

Mash Time
90 mins

Mash Target Temperature
68°C

Hops
Nugget (12%): 19g for 60 mins
(27 IBUs)

Yeast
US 05

Developing A Recipe To Brew

The Wolaver clone is darker and stronger, and slightly less bitter than mine.

For the new recipe I’ve opted to use my grain bill a starting point because I know it’s a nice beer.

However, black patent malt with coffee could result in excessive bitterness. I considered changing for chocolate malt, but I’m also nervous of using that for similar reasons!

Instead I’ll use roasted barley, for the first time. I hope it will contribute coffee flavours and work in the same direction as the rest of the beer.

Bitterness is also a concern when it comes to hops. I like the Wolaver clone’s idea of using Nugget hops because of the smooth bitterness they can add.

The Nugget pale ale I recently made was very clean, with a slight fruity sweet taste that might complement the coffee nicely.

I’ll copy the hopping schedule from that beer, adjusting it to match the IBUs of the Wolaver clone.

For the coffee I plan following the advice of Randy Mosher by using 113 to 227 g (4 to 8 ounces) per 19 litre batch. I’m not sure whether to go all out or subtle.

Coffee is obviously a dangerous ingredient that could completely overpower the rest of the beer. It’s naturally bitter and often acrid if badly prepared or over-stewed.

Most advice suggests that cold steeping offers the smoothest results.

I’m calling this a coffee porter but really I’m aiming for a dark coffee beer that tastes good.

Coffee Porter Recipe

Recipe Volume
15 litres

Malts
64% Pale Ale: 2.6 kg
17% Munich: 0.7kg
15% Crystal 30L: 0.60kg
4% Roasted Barley: 0.15kg
(O.G.: 1.056)

Mash Time
90 mins

Mash Target Temperature
68°C

Hops
Nugget (12%): 9g for 60 mins (FWH)
Nugget (12%): 9g for 20 mins
Nugget (12%): 9g for 5 mins
(26 IBUs)

More
90 to 180g cold steeped coffee added near end of fermentation

Yeast
Windsor Dry

Any tips would be gratefully received if you’ve brewed with coffee before!

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Comments...

  1. The fact that you used percentages in order to scale the recipe for any size is extremely helpful. Good on you!

    • John

      I always found myself converting recipes to percentages and decided it makes more sense to share them that way.

      Glad you agree!

      Cheers!